The pandemic forced many Americans into a mass social experiment: working from home (WFH). Now, economists like Steve Davis are measuring the immediate and long-term impact of this massive shift. Davis and Kate Lister join this week to help us explore how time away from the office will change life — for workers, employers, and our cities.

 

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Research Briefs·Jul 18, 2024

Historical Differences in Female-Owned Manufacturing Establishments: The United States, 1850-1880

Ruveyda Gozen, Richard Hornbeck, Anders Humlum and Martin Rotemberg
During the late 1800s, manufacturing establishments owned by females were smaller than those owned by males and had lower capital-to-output ratios. Female-owned establishments employed more women and paid women higher wages, and were concentrated in sub-industries like women’s clothing and...
Topics: Employment & Wages
Podcast Apr 16, 2024

Which Companies Discriminate Most? Experimental Evidence on Callback Rates by Applicant Race and Gender

Tess Vigeland and Evan K. Rose
A small number of companies are responsible for a substantial amount of the discrimination in today’s labor market. Who are they? In this episode of The Pie, Evan Rose, the Neubauer Family Assistant Professor in Economics discusses results from his...
Topics: Economic Mobility & Poverty, Employment & Wages
Research Briefs·Apr 8, 2024

A Discrimination Report Card

Patrick Kline, Evan K. Rose and Christopher R. Walters
A new statistical methodology is used to grade the race and gender callback gaps of large US employers and shows that firms assigned the worst grade are estimated to favor white applicants over Black applicants by 24%, while those assigned...
Topics: Economic Mobility & Poverty, Employment & Wages