We partnered with Alaska’s Pick.Click.Give. Charitable Contributions Program to implement a statewide natural field experiment with 540,000 Alaskans designed to explore whether targeted appeals emphasizing donor benefits through warm glow impact donations. Results highlight the relative import of appeals to self. Individuals who received such an appeal were 4.5 percent more likely to give and gave 20 percent more than counterparts in the control group. Yet, a message that instead appealed to recipient benefits had no effect on average donations relative to the control group. We also find evidence of long-run effects of warm glow appeals in the subsequent year.

More Research From These Scholars

BFI Working Paper Apr 30, 2019

Measuring Success in Education: The Role of Effort on the Test Itself

John List, Uri Gneezy, Jeffrey A. Livingston, Xiangdong Qin, Sally Sadoff, Yang Xu
Topics:  Early Childhood Education
BFI Working Paper Jan 24, 2019

The Dozen Things Experimental Economists Should Do (More Of)

Eszter Czibor, David Jimenez-Gomez, John List
Topics:  Tax & Budget, Technology & Innovation, Fiscal Studies
BFI Working Paper Jun 1, 2016

A New Approach to an Age-Old Problem: Solving Externalities by Incenting Workers Directly

John List, Greer Gosnell, Robert D. Metcalfe
Topics:  Early Childhood Education, Energy & Environment, Health care, K-12 Education, Economic Mobility & Poverty, Fiscal Studies